You see your little girl all the time. Of course. You watch over her constantly, making sure she’s fine at every step of the way.

 

But how often do you let your child know that you see her? See her for all she is and all she can become (without trying to mold her into the “ideal” child.)

 

The answer may be less often than you think.

 

The truth is that we all get caught up in our busy daily schedules and often forget to stop and recognize our children’s efforts and achievements on a daily basis. Because it’s not just the big achievements we need to recognize, like taking her first step, saying her first word, finishing first in her class, or winning a medal at swimming.

 

I’m talking about the small every-day achievements and efforts your girl puts into living life and into improving herself.

 

Stopping to Recognize Everyday Achievements

 

    • Not the first step, but just another step. Telling her “wow, look at all the way you walked around the house today! I’m so proud of you!”
    • Not finishing first in their class, but showing up every day and doing their homework. “I’m proud of you for putting all that effort in your homework. Look how your handwriting is improving!”
    • Not winning a medal but having the courage to try out a new sport or hobby, or simply practicing the one that they love. “I was watching you play ball in the yard just now. You’re doing so great, honey, you know that?”

     

    The Confidence of Being Seen

     

    When you let your child know that you see her, really see her, in her everyday activities, small or big, it helps boosts her confidence. Seeing is a form of loving. It lets your child know that she’s important to you, that you notice her, and that you’re there to encourage her no matter what.

     

    When you celebrate every step she takes towards achieving her goals (rather than waiting for a big goal to celebrate), you allow her to move towards those goals with greater confidence.

     

    Acknowledging Her Fully

     

    Seeing and acknowledging your girl shouldn’t come as verbal praise alone.

     

    An offhand comment—“oh, that was good”—without even raising your face from your phone screen won’t boost her confidence. You need to be there fully with her to make her feel loved.

     

    • Look at her when you acknowledge her.
    • Stand close to her or touch her shoulder
    • Listen to her response. What is she excited about in this accomplishment? It’s important to encourage her notion of improvement and not just your own.
    • Give her positive feedback that will encourage her to keep trying.

     

    Do You See Me?

     

    Seeing our children and acknowledging their efforts is one of the most important works a parent can do.

     

    Acknowledging your girl and all her efforts will help boost her confidence. And at Fiola, we’re all about girls’ confidence.

     

    What small accomplishment have you acknowledged for your girl today?

     

    How do you let her known she’s seen and loved on a daily basis?

     

    Let us know #fioladreams

     

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